lunar cathedral

~ Tuesday, August 7 ~
Permalink
Venus Just After Sunset   Credit & Copyright  Tunç Tezel (TWAN)

Venus Just After Sunset
Credit & Copyright Tunç Tezel (TWAN)

Tags: venus earth surface space science astronomy
4 notes
~ Monday, August 6 ~
Permalink
Prometheus Rising Through Saturn’s F Ring

Prometheus Rising Through Saturn’s F Ring

Tags: prometheus moons moons of saturn rings rings of saturn cassini space science astronomy
5 notes
Permalink
Saturn: Light, Dark, and Strange

Saturn: Light, Dark, and Strange

Tags: saturn rings rings of saturn cassini space science astronomy
8 notes
Permalink
Equinox and the Iron Sun

Equinox and the Iron Sun

Tags: sun space science astronomy
8 notes
~ Sunday, August 5 ~
Permalink
Earth and Moon from MESSENGER
Taken from a position as far away from Earth as Mercury.

Earth and Moon from MESSENGER

Taken from a position as far away from Earth as Mercury.

Tags: earth moon messenger space science astronomy
3 notes
Permalink
Comanche Outcrop on Mars

Comanche Outcrop on Mars

Tags: mars surface mars rovers space science astronomy
5 notes
Permalink
Eclipse Shadow Cone Over Patagonia   Credit & Copyright  Daniel Fischer (Cosmic Mirror)
Explanation:  Sometimes, during a total eclipse of the Sun, a strange shadow of darkness can be seen stretching off into the distance. Called shadow cones, they are visible because the Earth’s atmosphere is not completely transparent, scattering sunlight and hence appearing blue during the day. Shadow cones are particularly dramatic for eclipses near the horizon, as geometry creates a long corridor of sun-blocked air. Visible above is a shadow cone caught during a sunset total solar eclipse visible last month from Patagonia, Argentina. The eclipsed Sun itself still appears bright around the edges of the Moon because of light from the surrounding corona. A few minutes later, the Moon began to move away from the Sun as both set behind distant Andes mountains.

Eclipse Shadow Cone Over Patagonia
Credit & Copyright Daniel Fischer (Cosmic Mirror)

Explanation: Sometimes, during a total eclipse of the Sun, a strange shadow of darkness can be seen stretching off into the distance. Called shadow cones, they are visible because the Earth’s atmosphere is not completely transparent, scattering sunlight and hence appearing blue during the day. Shadow cones are particularly dramatic for eclipses near the horizon, as geometry creates a long corridor of sun-blocked air. Visible above is a shadow cone caught during a sunset total solar eclipse visible last month from Patagonia, Argentina. The eclipsed Sun itself still appears bright around the edges of the Moon because of light from the surrounding corona. A few minutes later, the Moon began to move away from the Sun as both set behind distant Andes mountains.

Tags: eclipse eclipses solar eclipse sun earth surface space science astronomy
18 notes
~ Saturday, August 4 ~
Permalink
Flowing Barchan Sand Dunes on Mars

Flowing Barchan Sand Dunes on Mars

Tags: mars surface dunes HiRISE space science astronomy
15 notes
Permalink
Prometheus Creating Saturn Ring Streamers 
 Explanation:  What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 80-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Above, several streamers or kinks are visible at once. The above photograph was taken in June by the robotic Cassini Spacecraft orbiting Saturn. The oblong moon Prometheus is visible on the far left.

Prometheus Creating Saturn Ring Streamers

Explanation: What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 80-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Above, several streamers or kinks are visible at once. The above photograph was taken in June by the robotic Cassini Spacecraft orbiting Saturn. The oblong moon Prometheus is visible on the far left.

Tags: saturn prometheus moons moons of saturn rings rings of saturn cassini space science astronomy
8 notes
Permalink
Four Planet Sunset   Credit & Copyright  Jia Hao
Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and the star Regulus

Four Planet Sunset
Credit & Copyright Jia Hao

Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and the star Regulus

Tags: sunsets earth surface space science astronomy
16 notes